A Steadily Declining Bird Population

4 October 19 | Posted in Animals, Garden, Spirituality, Stewardship

I have kept a backyard bird log for over a decade.  I note species, habits and any special occurrence—like hawk kills, mating pairs, the first bird of spring, sightings of rare birds like orioles. In the last few years I have seen less birds, different species and changes in feeding habits.

I was surprised to read an article on declining bird populations in the September 19, 2019 edition of the Wall Street Journal.  “Bird Populations Plummet in North America” the headline reads.  The Journal isn’t given to hysterical climate change stories, but the writer reported an alarming story.

Anecdotes from bird watchers and guesses among scientists led researchers to guess bird populations had declined; but the loss was much greater than originally speculated.  Ornithologists from Cornell University reported that North America’s overall bird population had dropped 29% since 1970, with about three billion fewer birds now than nearly 50 years ago. Their study was published in the September edition of Science magazine.

Researchers attribute the decline in grassland birds to the broader impact of climate change, deforestation and shifts in agricultural practices. Habitat loss and the use of pesticides also had an impact on their decline.  Grassland birds, which include species like finches and sparrows, saw its overall population fall 53%.  The decline in this group in particular surprised researchers, since these birds are known for their adaptability to human landscapes.

I keep my lawn chemical-free to protect bees, water, and “helpful” insects like spiders, ladybugs and praying mantis from indiscriminate spraying.  However, birds live in a wider area than my yard and many have not returned.  Personally, I have no doubt that the decline in these birds is due to the impact of all the chemical fertilizers, herbicides, and insecticides homeowners and farmers pour on their land every year.

Have you noticed any changes in bird population or behavior in your yard, local park or farm?

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